Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Basis of Presentation of Interim Period Statements

v3.20.2
Basis of Presentation of Interim Period Statements
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2020
Organization Consolidation And Presentation Of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation of Interim Period Statements

Note 1 - Basis of Presentation of Interim Period Statements

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited and have been prepared by Barrett Business Services, Inc. (“BBSI”, the “Company”, “our” or “we”), pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Certain information and note disclosures typically included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations.  In the opinion of management, the condensed consolidated financial statements include all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. The accompanying condensed financial statements are prepared on a consolidated basis. All intercompany account balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes.  Actual results may differ from such estimates and assumptions. The condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s 2019 Annual Report on Form 10-K at pages 32 – 58.  The results of operations for an interim period are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations for a full year.

Revenue recognition

Professional employer (“PEO”) services are normally used by organizations to satisfy ongoing needs related to the management of human capital and are governed by the terms of a client services agreement which covers all employees at a particular work site. Staffing revenues relate primarily to short-term staffing, contract staffing and on-site management services. The Company’s performance obligations for PEO and staffing services are satisfied, and the related revenue is recognized, as services are rendered by our workforce.

Our PEO client service agreements have a minimum term of one year, are renewable on an annual basis, and typically require 30 days’ written notice to cancel or terminate the contract by either party. In addition, our client service agreements provide for immediate termination upon any default of the client regardless of when notice is given. PEO customers are invoiced following the end of each payroll processing cycle, with payment generally due on the invoice date. Staffing customers are invoiced weekly based on agreed rates per employee and actual hours worked, typically with payment terms of 30 days. The amount of earned but unbilled revenue is classified as a receivable on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

We report PEO revenues net of direct payroll costs because we are not the primary obligor for these payments to our clients’ employees. Direct payroll costs include salaries, wages, health insurance, and employee out-of-pocket expenses incurred incidental to employment. We also present revenue net of safety incentives because these incentives represent consideration payable to customers.

Cost of revenues

Our cost of revenues for PEO services includes employer payroll-related taxes and workers’ compensation costs. Our cost of revenues for staffing services includes direct payroll costs, employer payroll-related taxes, employee benefits, and workers’ compensation costs. Direct payroll costs represent the gross payroll earned by staffing services employees based on salary or hourly wages. Payroll taxes and employee benefits consist of the employer’s portion of Social Security and Medicare taxes, federal and state unemployment taxes, and staffing services employee reimbursements for materials, supplies and other expenses, which are paid by our customer. Workers’ compensation costs consist primarily of claims reserves, claims administration fees, legal fees, medical cost containment (“MCC”) expense, state administrative agency fees, third-party broker commissions, risk manager payroll, premiums for excess insurance, and the fronted insurance program, as well as costs associated with operating our two wholly owned insurance companies, Associated Insurance Company for Excess (“AICE”) and Ecole Insurance Company (“Ecole”).

Cash and cash equivalents

We consider non-restricted short-term investments that are highly liquid, readily convertible into cash, and have maturities at acquisition of less than three months, to be cash equivalents for purposes of the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows and condensed consolidated balance sheets. The Company maintains cash balances in bank accounts that normally exceed FDIC insured limits. The Company has not experienced any losses related to its cash concentration.

Investments

The Company classifies investments as available-for-sale. The Company’s investments are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses, net of taxes, shown as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity. Investments are recorded as current on the condensed consolidated balance sheets as the invested funds are available for current operations. Management considers available evidence in evaluating potential impairment of investments, including the extent to which fair value is less than cost and adverse conditions related to the security. In the event of a credit loss, an allowance would be recognized to the extent that the fair value of the security is less than the present value of the expected future cash flows. Realized gains and losses on sales of investments are included in investment income in our condensed consolidated statements of operations.

Restricted cash and investments

The Company holds restricted cash and investments primarily for the future payment of workers’ compensation claims. These investments are categorized as available-for-sale. They are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses, net of taxes, shown as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity. Restricted cash and investments are classified as current and noncurrent on the condensed consolidated balance sheets based on the nature of the restriction. Management considers available evidence in evaluating potential impairment of restricted investments, including the extent to which fair value is less than cost and adverse conditions related to the security. In the event of a credit loss, an allowance would be recognized to the extent that the fair value of the security is less than the present value of the expected future cash flows. Realized gains and losses on sales of restricted investments are included in investment income in our condensed consolidated statements of operations.

Restricted cash and investments also includes investments held as part of the Company’s deferred compensation plan. These investments are classified as trading securities and are recorded at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported as a component of income (loss) from operations.

Allowance for doubtful accounts

The Company had an allowance for doubtful accounts of $784,000 and $888,000 at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. We make estimates of the collectability of our accounts receivable for services provided to our customers based on future expected credit losses. Management analyzes historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer credit-worthiness, current economic trends and changes in customers’ payment trends when evaluating the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts.  If the financial condition of our customers deteriorates, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances may be required.

Workers’ compensation claims liabilities

Our workers’ compensation claims liabilities do not represent an exact calculation of liability but rather management’s best estimate, utilizing actuarial expertise and projection techniques, at a given reporting date. The estimated liability for open workers’ compensation claims is based on an evaluation of information provided by our third-party administrator for workers’ compensation claims, coupled with an actuarial estimate of future loss development with respect to reported claims and incurred but not reported claims (together, “IBNR”). Workers’ compensation claims liabilities include case reserve estimates for reported losses, plus additional amounts for estimated IBNR claims, MCC and legal costs, unallocated loss adjustment expenses and estimated future recoveries. The estimate of incurred costs expected to be paid within one year is included in current liabilities, while the estimate of incurred costs expected to be paid beyond one year is included in long-term liabilities on our condensed consolidated balance sheets. These estimates are reviewed at least quarterly and adjustments to estimated liabilities are reflected in current operating results as they become known.

The process of arriving at an estimate of unpaid claims and claims adjustment expense involves a high degree of judgment and is affected by both internal and external events, including changes in claims handling practices, changes in reserve estimation procedures, inflation, trends in the litigation and settlement of pending claims, and legislative changes.

Our estimates are based on informed judgment, derived from individual experience and expertise applied to multiple sets of data and analyses. We consider significant facts and circumstances known both at the time that loss reserves are initially established and as new facts and circumstances become known. Due to the inherent uncertainty underlying loss reserve estimates, the expenses incurred through final resolution of our liability for our workers’ compensation claims will likely vary from the related loss reserves at the reporting date. Therefore, as specific claims are paid out in the future, actual paid losses may be materially different from our current loss reserves.

A basic premise in most actuarial analyses is that historical data and past patterns demonstrated in the incurred and paid historical data form a reasonable basis upon which to project future outcomes, absent a material change. Significant structural changes to the available data can materially impact the reserve estimation process. To the extent a material change affecting the ultimate claim liability becomes known, such change is quantified to the extent possible through an analysis of internal Company data and, if available and when appropriate, external data. Nonetheless, actuaries exercise a considerable degree of judgment in the evaluation of these factors and the need for such actuarial judgment is more pronounced when faced with material uncertainties.

Safety incentives

We accrue for and present expected safety incentives as a reduction of revenue. Safety incentives represent cash incentives paid to certain PEO client companies for maintaining safe-work practices and minimizing workplace injuries. The incentive is based on a percentage of annual payroll and is paid annually to customers who meet predetermined workers’ compensation claims cost objectives. Safety incentive payments are made only after closure of all workers’ compensation claims incurred during the customer’s contract period. The safety incentive liability is estimated and accrued each month based upon contract year-to-date payroll and the then current amount of the customer’s estimated workers’ compensation claims reserves as established by us and our third-party administrator. The Company provided $23.4 million and $28.0 million at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively, as an estimate of the liability for unpaid safety incentives.

Customer deposits

We require deposits from certain PEO customers to cover a portion of our accounts receivable due from such customers in the event of default of payment.

Comprehensive income (loss)

Comprehensive income (loss) includes all changes in equity during a period except those that resulted from investments by or distributions to the Company’s stockholders.

Other comprehensive income (loss) refers to revenues, expenses, gains and losses that under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) are included in comprehensive income (loss), but excluded from net income (loss) as these amounts are recorded directly as an adjustment to stockholders’ equity. Our other comprehensive income (loss) comprises unrealized holding gains and losses on our available-for-sale investments.

Statements of cash flows

Interest paid during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 did not materially differ from interest expense. Income taxes paid during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 totaled $3.2 million. Income taxes paid during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 totaled $10.1 million.

Bank deposits and other cash equivalents that are restricted for use are classified as restricted cash. The table below reconciles the cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash balances from our condensed consolidated balance sheets to the amounts reported on the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows (in thousands):

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

61,193

 

 

$

44,570

 

 

$

35,452

 

 

$

35,371

 

Restricted cash, included in restricted cash and

   investments

 

 

127,085

 

 

 

228,771

 

 

 

200,051

 

 

 

105,331

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

   shown in the statement of cash flows

 

$

188,278

 

 

$

273,341

 

 

$

235,503

 

 

$

140,702

 

 

Basic and diluted earnings per share

Basic earnings per share are computed based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for each year using the treasury method. Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential effects of the exercise of outstanding stock options and the issuance of stock associated with outstanding restricted stock units. Basic and diluted shares outstanding are summarized as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Weighted average number of basic shares outstanding

 

 

7,639

 

 

 

7,483

 

 

 

7,572

 

 

 

7,433

 

Effect of dilutive securities

 

 

70

 

 

 

228

 

 

 

116

 

 

 

253

 

Weighted average number of diluted shares outstanding

 

 

7,709

 

 

 

7,711

 

 

 

7,688

 

 

 

7,686

 

 

Accounting estimates

The preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods.  Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.  Estimates are used for fair value measurement of investments, allowance for doubtful accounts, deferred income taxes, carrying values for goodwill and property, equipment and software, accrued workers’ compensation liabilities and safety incentive liabilities.  Actual results may or may not differ from such estimates.

Recent accounting pronouncements

In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments – Credit Losses.” The ASU requires the use of an impairment model that is based on expected credit losses rather than incurred losses. The ASU also made changes to the impairment model for available-for-sale securities and requires the use of an allowance approach rather than writing down the security’s cost. The amendments in this update were adopted January 1, 2020 and did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.